Modern Architects

Best modern architects from LA surroundings

Richard Neutra

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Richard Joseph Neutra (April 8, 1892 – April 16, 1970) was an Austrian American architect. Living and building for the majority of his career in Southern California, he came to be considered among the most important modernist architects.

October 5th, 2016|Uncategorized|

Rudolph Schindler

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Rudolph Michael Schindler, born Rudolf Michael Schindler, radically changed the landscape of residential architecture in Los Angeles.

During his studies at the Bau-(Architektur) schule of the k.k, the Technische Hochschule (Polytechnic Institute), and the k.k. Akademie der bildenden Künste (Academy of Fine Arts) professors Carl König, Otto Wagner, and Adolf Loos conceptually laid the groundwork for Schindler’s contribution to modern architecture.

However, it was the work of Frank Lloyd Wright published in the Wasmuth Portfolio that proved most influential.

Schindler ended up working for Wright on the Imperial Hotel in Japan. During this time he traveled to Los Angeles to supervise one of Wright’s most important American commissions, the Hollyhock house for oil heiress Aline Barnsdall.

Schindler coined his style of modern architecture, “Space Architecture,” which focused on the design of interior space.

His personal residence known as the Schindler House, aka the Schindler Chace House, or Kings Road House located in West Hollywood, California, tested his interior concepts and was possibly the first modernist style home built in Los Angeles.

It was designed as a cooperative live/work space for two young families.

The LADBS initially denied Schindler a building permit because the notion of not including a conventional living room, dining room or bedrooms proved to be too radical of a concept.

He was eventually able to convince the LADBS otherwise.

About 150 of Schindler’s designs were built. While largely a collection of single-family homes that include the How House in Silver Lake and the Lovell Beach House in Newport Beach, his work also included the Manola Court apartment building for Herman Sachs, in Silver Lake and the Bethlehem Baptist Church, on Compton Avenue in Los Angeles.

To find a home designed by Schindler and other modernist architects visit mid-century modern homes for sale in Los Angeles.

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October 5th, 2016|Uncategorized|

Frank Lloyd Wright

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Frank Lloyd Wright was an American architect, interior designer, writer, educator and the man the AIA crowned as “the greatest American architect of all time.”

Organic architecture, a principle he practiced that’s rooted in the belief that architecture belongs “where you see it standing – and is a grace to the landscape instead of a disgrace” was his guiding force in the 1,100 structures he designed in the U.S.

While he designed commercial buildings, his most newsworthy structures are his single-family residences. Los Angelinos have the pleasure of bearing witness to some of his most recognizable work.

The first home he designed in Los Angeles was the Hollyhock House for oil heiress Aline Barnsdall. Located in Los Feliz the structure sits on a 36-acre hilltop site within Barnsdall Art Park.

In 2015 this architectural monument went through a painstaking restoration supervised by Hollyhock House curator Jeffrey Herr along with Hsiao-Ling Ting of the city’s Bureau of Engineering, and Kevin Jew of the nonprofit Project Restore, which wrote the grant for the project.

The dramatic volume of the structure is enhanced by geometric interpretations, made from concrete textile blocks, of the Hollyhock – Barnsdall’s favorite flowering plant. Wright went on to use the decorative textile blocks in the Ennis House, the Millard House, the Samuel Freeman House, and the Storer House.

The Hollyhock House was donated to the city of Los Angeles in 1927. Today, it is a public museum.

To see a current list of homes designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and other notable architects visit mid-century modern homes for sale in Los Angeles.

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John Lautner

John Edward Lautner is possibly the most innovative architect that ever lived.

An idyllic childhood in the Upper Peninsula formed his love for nature. And later, he learned the principles of Organic Architecture while working as an apprentice of Frank Lloyd Wright.

His residential structures are among the most iconic and architecturally significant single-family homes in Southern California. They include:

  • the Sheats Goldstein residence on the border of Beverly Hills
  • Bob Hope’s former residence in Palm Springs
  • a midcentury jewel in Silver Lake, CA known as Silvertop
  • the Garcia Residence, aka The Rainbow House
  • the Wolff Residence in the Hollywood Hills
  • the Schaffer Residence located at the base of the Verdugo Mts
  • Chemosphere in the Hollywood Hills
  • the Elrod House in Palm Springs. It was featured in the James Bond movie, Diamonds Are Forever

To find a modern home designed by John Lautner and other famous modern architects visit my curated list of mid-century modern homes for sale in Los Angeles.

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Raphael Soriano

Raphael Soriano

Raphael S. Soriano, a graduate of  University of Southern California’s School of Architecture, developed his signature style while interning for Richard Neutra, Rudolph Schindler, and working alongside fellow interns Gregory Ain and Harwell Hamilton Harris.

Steel and aluminum were trademarks of Soriano’s and became an integral part of his work.

Recipient of the American Institute of Architects (AIA) Southern California Chapter Three Award, Soriano spent his career significantly contributing to the mid-century modern movement.

Among his many achievements is a Case Study House, completing the home of renowned architectural photographer and friend Julius Shulman known as The Shulman residence, the 1964 Grossman House, the Polito House above the Sunset Strip, the Meyers House, Lipetz House and the Austrian Spencer House all in Silver Lake, the Ross House in Echo Park, the Gogol House in Los Feliz, the Lukens House in West Adams, and the Koosis House in the Hollywood Hills.

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Gregory Ain

Gregory Ain

Gregory Ain (March 28, 1908 – January 9, 1988) was an American architect active in the mid-20th century. Working primarily in the Los Angeles area, Ain is best known for bringing elements of modern architecture to lower- and medium-cost housing.

October 5th, 2016|Uncategorized|

Pierre Koenig

Case Study Houses

Pierre Koenig (October 17, 1925 – April 4, 2004) son of a salesman was an American architect who was born in San Francisco, enrolled in architectural studies and received his B. Arch. in 1952 from the University of Southern California.

Koenig worked with Raphael Soriano, among others, and began private practice in 1952. Koenig practiced mainly on the west coast and was most notable for the design of the Case Study Houses No. 21 and 22 in 1960. Both 21 and 22 were constructed on dramatic, otherwise-unbuildable sites.

 

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Craig Ellwood

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Craig Ellwood was not a licensed architect. Yet critics rank him as one of the most influential designers in the United States.

What he lacked in formal education he made up for with his charismatic personality, an eye for good design, self-promotion, and ambition.

An avid admirer of Mies van der Rohe, Ellwood’s architectural career took off while working as a cost estimator. According to an article published in the LA Times “Ellwood got work as a cost estimator with the contractors Lamport, Cofer, Salzman, who built for a number of prominent Modernist architects.” The firm served as contractors for the house that Charles and Ray Eames designed for themselves as Case Study House 8. They also built Eames’ and Eero Saarinen’s Case Study House 9 for John Entenza. Meeting there for the first time, Ellwood and Entenza hit it off, and after Ellwood established his own design office in the early 1950s, the editor of Arts & Architecture selected him to design Case Study houses 16, 17 and 18. Built between 1952 and 1958 with crucial design support from Becsky, Jacks and Lomax, these flat-roofed, post-and-beam, horizontally oriented structures of steel and glass, with accents of brick and concrete block, epitomized Entenza’s — and Ellwood’s — penchant for elegantly minimalist, finely detailed architecture.”

In addition to his work on the Case Study Houses, Ellwood designed the Scientific Facilities, the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, and the Smith House in Brentwood.

Ellwood’s Smith House and Moore House both were recently offered for sale. They opened to just as much architectural praise now as they did back in the day.

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October 5th, 2016|Uncategorized|

Joseph Eichler

Joseph Eichler

Joseph Eichler (1900–1974) was an American real estate developer known for bringing mid-century modern architecture to the masses.

With the help of modernist architects like Robert Anshen of Anshen & Allen, the San Francisco firm Claude Oakland & Associates, the Los Angeles firm of Jones & Emmons, A. Quincy Jones, and Raphael Soriano, Eichler developed a unique modern house design.

Fondly referred to as California Modern or simply Eichlers the design of the exterior features very few windows. The interior follow an open floor plan typical of a Frank Lloyd Wright or Mies van der Rohe residence.

He built over 11,000 homes during his lifetime including his own. His residential subdivisions of Mid-Century modern style tract housing are located in Northern California, mainly in San Francisco, Marin County, Sacramento, the East Bay towns of Walnut Creek, Concord, Oakland, Castro Valley, and the San Francisco Peninsula towns of San Mateo, Redwood City, Palo Alto, Sunnyvale, Mountain View and San Jose. In Southern California, Eichler Homes can be found in Thousand Oaks, Granada Hills, Orange, and Palm Springs.

Search for mid-century modern architecture for sale in Los Angeles.

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Paul Williams

Paul Williams

Paul Revere Williams, FAIA (February 18, 1894 – January 23, 1980), triumphed over racial stereotypes to become the most sought after architect among A-list celebs and the affluent in Los Angeles.

While he was versed in many architectural styles his signature designs became synonymous with Hollywood glamour. He was one of the architects responsible for the luxurious and palatial two-story, single-family homes gracing the sidewalks of Hancock Park.

He designed more than 2,000 residences and commercial structures throughout Southern California including the iconic LAX Theme Building.

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October 5th, 2016|Uncategorized|
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